What is a Psychoeducational Assessment?

A psychoeducational assessment is much broader than the standardised tests given in the classroom.  Attainment tests in reading, writing, spelling and maths are included, but there are also measures of abilities (both verbal and non-verbal) and diagnostic tests in areas such as phonological processing, visual-motor skills and behaviour ratings.

The psychologist works with the child or young person on a one-to-one basis and looks at the whole individual and their history.  The aim is to find out how that individual learns, what their strengths and weaknesses are, and if there are any Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) affecting the acquisition and processing of information in school.  Before the report is finalised, the psychologist will discuss with the parents and/or student the tests, scoring and implications for the individual, and also the rationale behind the assessment process.

What is a Psychoeducational Assessment?

A psychoeducational assessment is much broader than the standardised tests given in the classroom.  Attainment tests in reading, writing, spelling and maths are included, but there are also measures of abilities (both verbal and non-verbal) and diagnostic tests in areas such as phonological processing, visual-motor skills and behaviour ratings.

The psychologist works with the child or young person on a one-to-one basis and looks at the whole individual and their history.  The aim is to find out how that individual learns, what their strengths and weaknesses are, and if there are any Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) affecting the acquisition and processing of information in school.  Before the report is finalised, the psychologist will discuss with the parents and/or student the tests, scoring and implications for the individual, and also the rationale behind the assessment process.

The assessment findings subsequently guide teaching professionals on how to provide a child or young person with the tools they need to fulfil their potential.  If the report includes evidence of SpLD, along with documentation of the individual’s school work also providing such evidence, then a ‘picture of need’ can be submitted to an exam board for access arrangements, such as use of a laptop, extra time or a reader.  These access arrangements are to allow each child or young person to work to their full potential.  For example, the use of a laptop can help a student identified with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) such as Dyslexia, Dyspraxia/Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) structure their ideas more effectively and better demonstrate what is in their head.

A psychoeducational assessment is a first step towards understanding a child or young person more fully and therefore providing that individual with the support that is needed.

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